EFF party threatens Black revolution – White genocide

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His name may sound Roman, but Julius Malema is actually a Black South African, and he’s the leader of the EFF, the “Economic Freedom Fighters” political party.

Malema formed this new party after he was expelled from taking part in the African National Congress’s Youth League political party.

His new party is based on the position that after 20 years after apartheid, White people are still richer than most Black South Africans, and not yet economically “liberated”.

Though White people are less that 10% of South Africa, they are a majority of the economy; this is largely because of the skills they have, and not actually because of the land. As Whites are either murdered, or chased out of South Africa, so goes their skills and with it the economy. It is estimated by several sources that 1/4 of the White population has left since anti-apartheid, 1994, usually because of the effects of White genocide. Also, since 1994 between 3000 to 4000 thousand White farmers have been recorded, and estimated over 60 thousand Whites murdered in total.

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