Controversial Dubai investment: ‘SAMRO’ also in trouble

Die Vryburger

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Controversial Dubai investment: 'SAMRO' also in trouble. Photo: Die Vryburger
Controversial Dubai investment: 'SAMRO' also in trouble. Photo: Die Vryburger

The South African Music Law Organization (Samro) is an organization that collects copyright and distribution rights of music for composers and singers.

The body gets approximately R400 million annually, which must then be distributed among the members.

A controversial investment of R47 million in Dubai has not yielded any dividends and Sipho Dlamini, former CEO of Samro, is now blamed for the investment which was his his brainchild.

Two people in Dubai, Mohamed Khalaf and Yaser Aljabal, were paid more than R510 000 “salary” per month to replace Samro with a more profitable company.

Dlamini denies his involvement and puts the blame on the Council of Samro.

Observers believe Dubai’s involvement in state capture may be significantly greater than has been believed so far.

Read the original article in Afrikaans on Die Vryburger

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