Things You Should Never Forget Doing When Moving from South Africa to the UK

0

Although the number of South Africans moving to the United Kingdom has significantly reduced in our millennial age, there are still people moving to the UK. According to a survey conducted by Breytenbachs Immigration Consultants, there are seven major reasons that make many South African citizens move abroad especially to the UK.

Here they are.

Reasons for emigration

  • Search for adventure
  • Safety reasons
  • Corruption
  • Expanding business
  • Infrastructure
  • Search for a better quality of life for their children

Moving from South Africa to the UK is not something easy and can be very challenging considering that these are two different countries.  However, you can ease your movement by doing some of the following crucial matters.

Things You Should Never Forget Doing

  1. Getting your tax matters in order

The last thing you want to see is your earnings in the UK go to Reserve banks and SARS in paying defaulted taxes and penalties. Although by March 2020 some high earning South Africans who have emigrated to the UK will be exempt from tax, you should put your tax in order.  If you are still earning low in the UK then be sure that you are expected to pay tax according to South African tax laws.

  1. Emigrating your finances

This will basically help you when it comes to tax matters. The reason why you will pay tax to the revenue authority of South Africa even when you are working abroad in the UK is that you are still a resident of South Africa. Financial emigration involves changing your status to non-resident of South Africa with the South African Reserve Bank. Even if you got the UK spouse visa that will enable your spouse to join you in UK, let them emigrate their finance; that doesn’t mean they will lose their citizenship.

  1. Transferring your cash

Getting a forex agent to do for you exchange is a great idea when it comes to transferring your cash. Banks usually give very low exchange rates and of course, you want more Pounds for each Rand you exchange. So don’t go to the banks else you will have fewer Pounds to start your new life in the United Kingdom.

  1. Going for check-ups

If you are planning to stay in the U for over 6 months then you have to go for TB tests. This should happen before you get your visa or the UK spouse visa for your loved one. When doing visa application the TB test certificate will be needed. You need to be going for the test every year since immigration control will need it. Visiting a dentist at the UK can be costly that’s why you should do the oral health checkups before you leave.

  1. Looking for a residence

Now that you have that visa and the UK spouse visa after a long process, why don’t you be sure of where you are going to live? You need to look for a place where you will be getting what is found in South Africa. Nevertheless, you can decide to go to a completely new and different place from where your fellows are.

If you do the above you can be sure that your moving to the UK will be smooth. If you want to stay around fellow South Africans, then Wimbledon and Wandsworth are great residences. Don’t leave your loved one behind, get experts who can easily get you the UK spouse visa. Good luck!

Related Post

5 Brave Financial Decisions that Single Mothers Ha... Ever noticed how some single mothers succeed financially despite their constant life challenges? Even though they are the sole providers for their kid...
South Africa: Fraudulent Bank Payments The newest scam that is doing the rounds is whereby a person’s email account is compromised in such a way that someone gains access to their email, ge...
Single? You still should get life insurance Did you know that fewer South Africans are getting married nowadays, with only 2.5 of every 1,000 people opting to tie the knot*? What’s more, those w...
10 Ways To Manage Your Money Better in 2019 As we rush head-first into 2019, how are those New Years resolutions holding up? Now that the infamous ‘Janu-worry’ has come to an end, it’s a good ti...
Disclaimer: The views of authors published on South Africa Today are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of South Africa Today. By viewing, visiting, using, or interacting with SouthAfricaToday.net, you are agreeing to all the provisions of the Terms of Use Policy and the Privacy Policy.