Why CBD is So Popular – Some Interesting Facts

0

Most people know what CBD is because of the recent notoriety the CBD market has received, thanks to the signing of the new 2018 Farm Bill that opened up markets to hemp products as never before. CBD is a hemp product, but it isn’t the only by-product of hemp. Let’s learn some interesting facts about CBD and hemp.

  • Hemp was used as long ago as 6000 years. The Chinese were using hemp as a food source. Hemp fibers were found in pottery that was used as food storage in unearthed archeological excavations. Hemp was also used by the Chinese as an herbal remedy as far back as 3000 years ago, according to written records from that time period. Their society already understood that hemp could ease digestive discomfort and seemed to make people feel better overall. Vitaleaf Naturals has more information on their website about the feelings of well-being that accompany CBD use.

 

  • Hemp was used in the United States as an herbal remedy and food source prior to 1937. In that year, hemp was criminalized as a member of the cannabis family. There are many sources of information that seem to point to the fact that hemp was criminalized not for being a cannabis plant but due to the fact that hemp could easily replace trees in making all paper goods. Trees were a huge source of revenue for the lumber barons and cotton was also the primary crop of the south. People had built companies from cutting trees to make lumber and growing cotton to produce clothing and textiles. Both of these industries could have gone under if hemp had been allowed to remain legal. Those who were wealthy and powerful lobbied until they successfully got hemp banned in America, saving their own wealth and their legacy.

 

  • Hemp is a renewable source of paper goods which, quite honestly, would have been far better for the environment than growing and cutting trees that take years to grow back. In fact, for generations, cutting trees was done without planting more to replace them, they simply went in search of more forests. This has likely contributed to global warming and the destruction of forests all over the world. Hemp can be planted, grown, and cultivated in a few weeks, yet it was an illegal crop to grow for generations. In 2014 it was finally decriminalized to grow hemp under certain restrictions and oversight, because it is a cannabinoid. In 2018, new changes to the Farm Bill threw the doors open even wider by decriminalizing the possession and use of hemp products, creating a market for textiles and CBD oils which has exploded in a few short months.

 

  • The Greeks may have been the first society who ‘prescribed’ the oils of cannabis plants for medicinal purposes. They referred to the oil as ‘juice’ and knew that it could help heal things like ear pain. It was approximately 65-70 CE (Common Era) when written texts from the Greeks were found to have included passages regarding the use of cannabis as a remedy for pain and it began to see wide use that eventually spread to the Byzantines and the Roman Empire. For your dosing guide in modern times, you can refer to Vitaleaf Naturals. They have a great guide to give you some reference for where to start and when to increase a dose.
  • CBD oil may help to cure cancer. Lab rats with tumors were given CBD oil and it shrank their tumors. This experiment has been recreated with mice as well. More research is being done fervently and scientists hope that they will continue to learn more about the benefits of using CBD for cancer. The National Cancer Institute has even released findings that CBD (when used with THC) is not just effective in reduction of symptoms associated with cancer treatment, it also seems to have the ability to hinder and even destroy tumor cells. This is particularly conclusive in cases of breast cancer.

While no one is conclusively calling CBD a proven way to rid yourself of cancer just yet, it does show a great deal of promise that warrants further research and focus. Gradually we grow closer to unlocking the secrets to ending cancer and many other diseases, with ongoing research and dedicated scientists who devote their lives to finding answers to end the suffering of so many. That legacy began in the earliest day so of the history of mankind and continue today.

  • CBD is a neuroprotectant. It actually works in the body to protect the neural network of the brain and may even improve brain function. CBD, with exceptionally low levels of THC (the psychoactive compound so commonly associated with marijuana) has been proven to drastically reduce seizure activity. In fact, CBD is so good at reducing the seizures in people with epilepsy that a new drug was developed for the treatment of their seizures that includes CBD (cannabidiol) as the primary active ingredient. The FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved this drug and this was a huge step forward in the fight to use cannabis for the things that we know it helps.

 

  • Cannabis has been around for possibly as long life on earth. It produces cannabinoids and so do our bodies. We humans have a shared history with this plant that goes much further back than our ability to write, most likely. You might be left to wonder if ancient cavemen knew about the uses of hemp? The fibers of the plant may have been used to bind spears together and twist into strong hemp rope. Perhaps hemp was a food source millions of years ago for life that inhabited the planet even before modern day humans? These may be things that we’ll never know but we can definitely determine how hemp is used going forward and we are taking those steps now. CBD oil stocked on shelves is your proof.

 

More Interesting Articles you should read:

https://southafricatoday.net/lifestyle/health/does-cbd-oil-relieve-arthritis-pain/

https://southafricatoday.net/lifestyle/health/tips-for-choosing-a-plastic-surgeon/

https://southafricatoday.net/lifestyle/pets/best-cbd-oil-for-dogs-cats-horses-and-other-pets/

Disclaimer: The views of authors published on South Africa Today are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of South Africa Today. By viewing, visiting, using, or interacting with SouthAfricaToday.net, you are agreeing to all the provisions of the Terms of Use Policy and the Privacy Policy.