Exploring a hidden rainforest on an isolated mountain in Mozambique

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  • On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Julian Bayliss, a conservation scientist and explorer who recently discovered a hidden rainforest on top of an isolated mountain in Mozambique.
  • Like many other mountains in eastern Africa, Mount Lico is what’s known as an “inselberg” — a German word that means “island mountain.” Bayliss initially spotted the forest atop Mount Lico using Google Earth. He then confirmed its existence via drone reconnaissance, before mounting a campaign to actually scale Mount Lico’s sheer, 410-foot cliffs and explore the forest firsthand.
  • On this episode, Julian Bayliss discusses what it was like to behold the unspoiled forest atop Mount Lico for the first time, the new species he found there, and the significance of the pottery he discovered in the rainforest even though no locals have ever been to the top of the mountain.

On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Julian Bayliss, a conservation scientist and explorer who recently discovered a hidden rainforest on top of an isolated mountain in Mozambique.

Listen here:

 

Like many other mountains in eastern Africa, Mount Lico is what’s known as an “inselberg” — a German word that means “island mountain.” These isolated peaks formed over millions of years as the surrounding area gradually eroded away, leaving monoliths of harder rock, like granite, that erupt from the landscape.

Bayliss initially spotted the forest atop Mount Lico using Google Earth. He then confirmed its existence via drone reconnaissance, before mounting a campaign to actually scale Mount Lico’s sheer, 410-foot cliffs and explore the forest firsthand. Mongabay covered Bayliss’s discovery last year, shortly after the expedition took place in May 2018.

On this episode, Julian Bayliss discusses what it was like to behold the unspoiled forest atop Mount Lico for the first time, the new species he found there, and the significance of the pottery he discovered in the rainforest even though no locals have ever been to the top of the mountain.

First ever image of the forest on top of Mount Lico. Photo by Julian Bayliss.
Mount Lico drone shot at lowest climbing point. Photo by Julian Bayliss.
Tim Hounsome, a member of the expedition, climbing Mount Lico. Photo by Julian Bayliss.

You can view more photos of Mount Lico at Julian Bayliss’s website.

Here’s this episode’s top news:

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Mount Lico towers above the land around it, most of which has been converted for agriculture. Photo by Julian Bayliss.

Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001

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This story first appeared on Mongabay

South Africa Today – Environment



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