Electronic Line Calling To Feature In Madrid

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The Mutua Madrid Open will begin an innovative new chapter in its tournament history this year, as Electronic Line Calling — the electronic review technology for clay courts — will make its debut on each of the tournament’s three main courts.

Players competing at Manolo Santana Stadium, Arantxa Sánchez-Vicario Stadium and Stadium 3, which all feature retractable roofs, will be able to challenge line calls in both singles and doubles matches, including play during the qualifying rounds. The use of the technology on clay, developed by FOXTENN, was officially approved by the ATP in November 2019 and is being trialled at select tournaments by both the ATP and WTA.

After an application process for the use of electronic review, the Mutua Madrid Open will be the only ATP Masters 1000 and WTA Premier Mandatory tournament that has the option to use this innovation during this year’s European clay swing.

“We’re very proud to have the opportunity to use Electronic Line Calling at the Mutua Madrid Open 2020. It has always been a hallmark of our tournament to innovate and lead the way, therefore the use of this technology reaffirms that spirit,” said Tournament Director Feliciano Lopez.

“In addition, there is no doubt that it will provide significant extra help to the players. I am so happy about this huge development. It was something we needed on clay, and we’re very happy to have it at the Caja Magica. I would like to reiterate Madrid’s commitment to always being at the cutting edge of technology.”

The use of electronic review on clay is designed to improve the accuracy of umpiring and it was introduced for the first time on the ATP Tour on hard courts at the 2006 Miami Open presented by Itau. Since then, it has been added to other surfaces — apart from clay — where the protocol of allowing players to ask the umpire to check the ball mark during points was maintained.

Source ATP World Tour

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